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to protect the Inland Temperate Rainforest and endangered Mountain Caribou

Latest News

mountain caribou temperate rainforest inland BCVWS
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KILLING WOLVES IS A COVER UP FOR DESTROYING CARIBOU HABITAT

The BC government is using wolf culls to create an appearance of saving Mountain Caribou, while continuing to decimate the habitat of the caribou. The two greatest causes of caribou decline are habitat destruction and motorized recreation in winter habitat. These activities cause increased predation on caribou: clearcuts draw and increase wolves, roads give them highways for easy hunting, and snow packed by snowmobile and ski tracks provides them with easy access to caribou winter habitat. The most urgently needed conservation actions are protection of remaining old growth forest and exclusion of winter recreation in high-value caribou habitat. Please read more.
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Urgent Support Needed for Ancient Inland Rainforest Proposals

Three new BC provincial parks have been proposed to permanently protect the most ancient and ecologically rich remnants of the Inland Temperate Rainforest ecosystem in BC. This globally rare and significant ecosystem is a massive carbon bank and stronghold for rich biodiversity. Valhalla Wilderness Society needs your help to permanently protect it for future generations.
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Proposed Zincton Resort Town Likely To Decimate Grizzly Bears & Other Wildlife

Along the scenic Highway 31A, between New Denver and Kaslo, a developer has proposed a luxury resort for skiing and mountain biking, with a capacity for 1,750 guests a day. Gondolas would carry up to 1,500 guests a day onto London and Whitewater Ridges. The whole area is prime grizzly bear and mountain goat habitat, and is frequently used by many residents of the region for noncommercial recreation.

Current Campaigns

MOUNTAIN CARIBOU – The battle to save the critically endangered Deep-snow Mountain Caribou.

LARGE CARNIVORES – VWS opposes wolf culls and maternity pens for caribou cows, and focuses on the real problem: habitat destruction.

WESTERN TOADS – A project to protect biodiversity by reducing human-caused mortality of threatened western toads.

GRIZZLY BEARS – A welcome but fragile end to grizzly bear hunting.

VWS has achieved decades of research in the Inland Temperate Rainforest region of British Columbia. The result is a portfolio of three proposals for new parks that would protect high-biodiversity old-growth Inland Temperate Rainforest and many species at risk. WATCH THE SHORT FILM, Primeval: Enter the Incomappleux.

Fifty-eight scientists, organizations, businesses and advocates across British Columbia are calling for a major expansion of BC’s Parks and Protected Areas to preserve biodiversity and take meaningful action on climate change.

The Grow BC Parks Coalition is petitioning the Provincial and First Nation governments of British Columbia to immediately protect BC’s remaining intact natural areas.

Tsilquot’in, Friends of Nemaiah Valley, VWS and others are working to protect BC’s last 1,000 wild horses from government culls and other threats generated by the cattle industry. These are the last of tens of thousands of wild horses that once ran free in the interior BC grassland belt. The last wild horse cull was in 1988. Lacking any legislative protection, they are constantly under threat of indiscriminate shooting and government culls.

History of Valhalla Wilderness Society

Valhalla Provincial Park stretches from the far shore of Slocan Lake in British Columbia, to the mountaintops.

Valhalla Provincial Park was created in 1983 after eight years of hard-won battle by the Valhalla Wilderness Society (VWS). VWS went on to successfully spearhead campaigns for the Khutzeymateen Grizzly Bear Sanctuary, Goat Range Provincial Park, and the Spirit Bear Conservancies on Princess Royal Island. The charitable organization also played one of the key roles in the protection of South Moresby National Park Reserve. Its Endangered Wilderness Map of 1988 initiated the movement to double BC’s park system to 12% of the province. VWS has led park campaigns that now protect over 560,000 hectares. The work resulted in numerous national and international conservation awards received by Chairperson Colleen McCrory.

Take action to save
our beloved wilderness